Skip to the content.

Refactoring UI

Pretty awesome new YouTube channel. The guy takes a basic web design and makes it fancy/modern/nice/usable.

Related: the Twitter account from the same guy.

Balance

You know that phrase: turn your hobby into your job and you’ll never work another day? Yeah, I was naive enough to believe that too.

But when the company you work for suddenly changes culture, your once purposeful and fulfilling job may turn into something cumbersome and mentally tiring. And bit by bit your hobby — the thing that you’re passionate about — starts to feel like work.

Work and life really are polar opposites. They attract and repel and are never really in balance.

Odd Duck Out. What’s a computer anyway?

One of these four is not like the others. Some call the Mac a computer. But it’s kinda becoming a relic of older times.

The iPhone is the phone that made traditional cellphones feel old and limited. Similarly, the definition of computer, especially a mobile computer, is rapidly moving past macOS, and I really think soon that what we think of as computers will be synonymous with these Chrome toasterfridges and iOS iPads.

And the Mac? It’ll feel and look like a Nokia 3210 in comparison. A classic from days past.

Green Apple

Apple Now Runs On 100% Green Energy, And Here’s How It Got There.

Wow.

Play Alexa Audio Routines on Sonos

Alexa now allows for routines that start audio playback. So for example you can say “Alexa, start the radio” and it’ll start playing your favorite radio station from TuneIn on your Alexa. (You can’t use play radio for some reason)

Sadly, by default, the interface doesn’t allow you to execute these commands on a Sonos One or redirect the audio to a Sonos speaker.

But there’s a workaround:

If you want to play a certain radio channel on the Sonos in the kitchen: start by creating a new routine in the Alexa app:

  1. Set an Alexa trigger, eg “start the radio”
  2. Add a Music action
  3. Type out the name of the channel or track you want to play and set the source. For radio, it’s TuneIn
  4. Append the sentence “in the kitchen”, to redirect the chosen music to the Sonos speaker in the kitchen.

The screenshots above will probably explain it better. 

Complexity

This shows the main difference between Apple Siri/HomeKit and Alexa. Alexa allows for these kind of hacks. But it makes for a frustrating experience because the advanced features don’t always work as expected.

Siri is locked and doesn’t allow these kind of workarounds. But the basic audio features Apple promises do work right out of the box.

It’s iOS stable and closed vs Android tweakable but unstable all over again.

It’s an iPad

An iPad. With pencil support.

It’s an iPad.

Steve Jobs. 1992

Three takeaways:

Also, if anyone can explain me what he means with Objects?  I get the gist but an example of companies that sell objects would be great Does he mean something similar to homebrew packages but commercially?

Bike Sharing

Nice addition to Apple Maps: search for bike sharing and the app will show you nearby bike sharing stations in supported cities, like my hometown, Antwerp.

Change the title of iCloud Photo Library Memories

Yesterday I got a notification for a memory from three years ago called Kris’s Birthday. iCloud Photos had somehow found out that it was Kris’s birthday yesterday, and that he and I were at the same event on his birthday a few years ago.

I really like these kind of memories and alerts. They’re timely, often bring back events I had forgotten about, and the photo selection is quite good.

Only, this time, the event itself had nothing to do with the fact that it was my friend’s birthday. And I couldn’t find a way to change the memory’s title within iOS Photos.

Thanks to @joshducharme, that’s now been solved:

How to change a Memory

On minimalism

We’re moving next week, so naturally we’ve started packing our stuff already.

Last night, my wife made the most thought provoking remark about our current stack of boxes that kept me thinking:

Basically, all those boxes we packed a week in advance is stuff we don’t need to live.

We pretend, or we like to believe, we’re both minimalists in our approach to live. We don’t have a lot of little stuff around, only have a dozen physical books, with all media being digital.

Even so, when packing boxes you discover that you still have too much stuff. Who needs 4 bottle openers. Do we even read those 12 books often enough to warrant shelve space? Why do we keep moving that set of dinner plates we never use?

We’re currently cooking and eating with a reduced set of items. A few glasses, cups and plates. And we manage.

Our living room is empty. All shelves have been packed and all framed items safely stored. Even so. We still relax in the sofas and enjoy our evenings.

It’s also telling what we didn’t pack yet. Sonos. WiFi. Coffee. Basically, what you pack last is what you really need to live. The rest? Joys of life, extra’s, just stuff.

Moving. It makes you think.